Diaspora Vibe Virtual Gallery

Art-Related Events this Weekend

From Picasso to Koons: The Artist as Jeweler

From Tuesdays to Sundays, until July 21

Bass Museum of Art (2100 Collins Ave. - Miami Beach, FL 33139)

Price: $8

Featuring nearly 200 ornaments from notable names such as Max Ernst, Pablo Picasso, Salvador Dalí, Yoko Ono and Anish Kapoor, “From Picasso to Koons: The Artist as Jeweler” features rings, pendants, brooches, necklaces, and other precious adornments by 135 artists.

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BAC’s Audrey Love Pavilion Grand Opening Celebration

Friday, May 17, 2013, 7 pm - 10pm

Bakehouse Art Complex (561 NW 32nd Street - Miami, FL 33127)

Price: Free for members, $10 for non-members

The official opening of Bakeouse Art Complex’s (BAC) Audrey Love Pavillion will feature – besides works of its many international artists – music, drinks and food.

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Women in Motion: Fitness, Sport, and the Female Figure

Daily until August 18

The Wolfsonian-FIU (1001 Washington Ave. - Miami Beach, FL 33139)

Price: free-$7

Exhibition “Women in Motion: Fitness, Sport, and the Female Figure” illustrates the early part of the 20th Century, when women were barred from sports but yet encouraged to keep their figures attractive. From magazine covers to political propaganda, Wolfsonian’s collection portrays women as a source of sex appeal, vigor and, occasionally, character of self-fulfillment.

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Frames of Reference

From Tuesdays to Sundays, until June 2

Miami Art Museum (101 W. Flagler St. -Miami, FL 33130)

Price: $10

“Frames of Reference”f eatures 45 works of Latin American art from the Jorge M. Pérez collection, that has recently donated 110 pieces to the museum. Moments in Latin American art history are represented by names such as José Bedia, Beatriz González, Wifredo Lam, Diego Rivera, and Joaquín Torres García.

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Teen Miami

From Tuesdays to Sundays, until June 16

History Miami (101 W. Flagler St. - Miami, FL 33130)

Price: $5 - $8

“Teen Miami” explores teen life and culture in Miami through the decades. Archive, photos, music, exhibitions, the exhibit help explore how youngsters were affected by World War II and the Vietnam War, and theirs roles in the integration of Miami’s high schools. 

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Ebony Patterson at the Frost Art Museum

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Ebony Patterson expresses through her work issues of gender and sexuality and the notions of identity in Jamaica, country where she was born and currently resides. Using mixed media paintings, drawings and collages, photography, found objects, installation and performance, she explores constructions of the masculine within popular culture.

In collaboration with Kenyan artist Peterson Kamwathi Waweru, she will investigate identity and the influence of colonialism in her upcoming show ‘Six Degrees of Separate Nations’. The exhibition will feature a collaborative installation where the artists will meet for the first time and respond to each other’s works. 

Jewelry Trunk Show at DVCA

Diaspora Vibe will host a Jewelry Trunk Show next Sunday, featuring Solomon’s Strands jewelry. Designed by artist Renée Solomon, the pieces are one of a kind, handcrafted using hand-selected semiprecious stones sourced from around the world.

Renée, a Jamaican native, says her artistic inspiration comes from the kaleidoscope of shapes and color patterns found in butterflies, fish and flowers, as well as her world travels and the eclectic Caribbean art that has always surrounded her.

Jewelry by Solomon’s Strands is worn on several continents, including women in South Africa, Amsterdam and Guyana. Some even request custom-made pieces with a specific combination of gemstones because of their healing qualities. Renée says she considers jewelry “not just an expression of a person’s taste, but it can also reveal feelings and an intimate story”.

The show will take place at Diaspora Vibe on Sunday, April 28th, from 4 to 6PM. If you’d like to come and find unique jewelry, please RSVP to rgw@diasporavibe.net

Visit Solomon’s Strand website: www.solomonstrands.com

An Evening with Filmmaker Gloria Rolando in Miami

Celebrated Afro-Cuban documentary filmmaker Gloria Rolando was in Miami yesterday premiere of her new film, 1912: Breaking the Silence. The documentary highlights the role of U.S. foreign policy in the Caribbean and its political influence, and social events in Cuba at the turn of the twentieth century.

In the gathering, Gloria talked about her work, experiences and future projects. She also answered questions and debated with guests about her feature documentary.  

We will post more pictures of the event shortly.

About Gloria Rolando

Born in Havana, Cuba, Gloria Rolando began her career as a filmmaker in 1976, when she graduated in Art History at the University of Havana. She then began working with the Cuban Film Institute (ICAIC), where she transitioned to filmmaking and started making documentaries and features. 

Gloria Rolando’s work focuses is the African diaspora history and culture in the Caribbean. She is best known for films such as Oggun: An Eternal Presence, about Cuban Yoruba singer Lazaro Ros; My Footsteps in Baragua, a recounting of the history of a West Indian community in Cuba; and Eyes of the Rainbow, a documentary on Assata Shakur, the Black Panther and Black Liberation Army leader who took refuge in Cuba. 

Rolando is also a founding member Imagines del Caribe, an independent film collective based in Havana that is dedicated to developing projects that focus on Afro-descendant communities in Cuba to recognize the scholastic significance of African Diaspora research and historiography.

The Caribbean Film Traveling Exhibition

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The “Caribbean Traveling Film Showcase” made a call today to Caribbean filmmakers and those from other countries to participate in the sixth edition of the event in Havana.

According to the Prensa Latina news agency, their competing works will address “issues and stories that authentically and aesthetically express the social life, history and culture of the countries of the Caribbean,” while emphasizing films that reveal the richness and diversity of the region’s music.

The call will remain open until May 15 and will include films made by children and young participants in various audiovisual projects in Caribbean nations.

The Exhibition will feature work in a variety of genres (feature films, shorts, documentaries, cartoons) to be selected by an International Selection Committee. The films of the program will be subtitled by the Office of the Travelling Caribbean Film in Spanish, English, French, Portuguese and Haitian Creole as required.

The notification states that the materials must be sent before May 15 to: Office of the Traveling Caribbean Film-ICAIC. Calle 12 No. 555 between 23 and 25. Vedado, Havana, Cuba. CP 10400

Fulbright Scholars at Diaspora Vibe - Aimee Lee
Above Image - Hide, by Aimee Lee
Oberlin graduate and artist Aimee Lee (’99) was granted a Research Fulbright Fellowship to study paper-making in Korea during the 2008-2009 academic year. After graduating from Oberlin College in 1999 with a BA in Visual Arts, she went on to study at Columbia College in Chicago, where she graduated with a MFA in Interdisciplinary Book and Paper Arts in 2006. She was also named an honorary artist member at the Center for Book Arts in New York.

Phone Stories 2 by Aimee Lee
In her work she fashions unconventional books out of fabrics and fibers. Her artistic output is expansive in its reach, spanning the genres of performance, installation, and book arts media. The Clarence Ward Art Library recently bought one of Lee’s knitted books. It is on display at the library.
Diaspora Vibe Gallery presented Aimee Lee as she extended her paper trail to her debut Miami solo exhibition of reflections on paper and recent work. Her medium is pulp; the vehicle is water-dipping, beating sifting. She had recently completed a year of Hanji history, practice and contemporary research in Korea where as a Fulbright Scholar she learned this ancient art of paper making. Her book-making, installation performance artwork uses paper that distinctly takes on a life of its own. Native Intelligence, exhibited by Diaspora Vibe Gallery, presented new artworks that reside primarily in tradition and generational memory made tactile and texture-filled from the outcome of this ancient Hanji practice. Curated by Rosie Gordon-Wallace, Native Intelligence examined Aimee Lee’s journey with paper.

“There is a certain freedom, sense of play, fantasy, and physical repetition that is associated with paper making that allows her to create a medium that supports their personal narratives”, states curator Rosie Gordon–Wallace “This art jumps off the page and walls and exists in real time. This artist actively inserts herself into the foreground, instead of the background, and challenges traditional representations of figure, background, and object.”
Gordon Myers co-curator and Entertainment Director of Diaspora Vibe Gallery states, “This is the first time that Diaspora Vibe has devoted a complete exhibition to the art of paper making. It speaks to a need to address how many artists are actively utilizing these genres to redefine personal definitions of Diaspora, through examinations of their own bodies, geographies and borders. Native Intelligence frames the conversation around the new social and cultural spaces that many artists of color and immigrant artists are creating while revisiting cultural traditions and transforming the media into contemporary forms”

Fulbright Scholars at Diaspora Vibe - Aimee Lee

Above Image - Hide, by Aimee Lee

Oberlin graduate and artist Aimee Lee (’99) was granted a Research Fulbright Fellowship to study paper-making in Korea during the 2008-2009 academic year. After graduating from Oberlin College in 1999 with a BA in Visual Arts, she went on to study at Columbia College in Chicago, where she graduated with a MFA in Interdisciplinary Book and Paper Arts in 2006. She was also named an honorary artist member at the Center for Book Arts in New York.

Phone Stories 2 by Aimee Lee

In her work she fashions unconventional books out of fabrics and fibers. Her artistic output is expansive in its reach, spanning the genres of performance, installation, and book arts media. The Clarence Ward Art Library recently bought one of Lee’s knitted books. It is on display at the library.

Diaspora Vibe Gallery presented Aimee Lee as she extended her paper trail to her debut Miami solo exhibition of reflections on paper and recent work. Her medium is pulp; the vehicle is water-dipping, beating sifting. She had recently completed a year of Hanji history, practice and contemporary research in Korea where as a Fulbright Scholar she learned this ancient art of paper making. Her book-making, installation performance artwork uses paper that distinctly takes on a life of its own. Native Intelligence, exhibited by Diaspora Vibe Gallery, presented new artworks that reside primarily in tradition and generational memory made tactile and texture-filled from the outcome of this ancient Hanji practice. Curated by Rosie Gordon-Wallace, Native Intelligence examined Aimee Lee’s journey with paper.

“There is a certain freedom, sense of play, fantasy, and physical repetition that is associated with paper making that allows her to create a medium that supports their personal narratives”, states curator Rosie Gordon–Wallace “This art jumps off the page and walls and exists in real time. This artist actively inserts herself into the foreground, instead of the background, and challenges traditional representations of figure, background, and object.”

Gordon Myers co-curator and Entertainment Director of Diaspora Vibe Gallery states, “This is the first time that Diaspora Vibe has devoted a complete exhibition to the art of paper making. It speaks to a need to address how many artists are actively utilizing these genres to redefine personal definitions of Diaspora, through examinations of their own bodies, geographies and borders. Native Intelligence frames the conversation around the new social and cultural spaces that many artists of color and immigrant artists are creating while revisiting cultural traditions and transforming the media into contemporary forms”

Melanie Choisy to Represent St. Maarten at the UNESCO Caribbean Youth Forum on Safeguarding Intangible Cultural Heritage
PHILIPSBURG, St. Maarten - The UNESCO Caribbean Youth Forum on Safeguarding Intangible Cultural Heritage will be held November 20-24 in Grenada.
The objectives of the forum are to:
build knowledge of youth on the Convention’s concepts and mechanisms and their role in safeguarding intangible cultural heritage;
foster dialogue among youth on strategies to strengthen the safeguarding of intangible cultural heritage;
orient youth toward activities and collaboration geared at safeguarding their intangible cultural heritage, and building mutual respect for the heritage of others.
The five-day forum which will be structured around a number of sessions will be attended by approximately 25 participants from youth groups/organizations from about 16 different Caribbean Small Island and Developing States (SIDS) and Least Developed Countries (LDCs).
At the conclusion of the session, participants will draft a brief report on their experience during the Forum, which will be submitted to the 7th session of the Intergovernmental Committee for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage.
Melanie Choisy who is a 22-year-old recent graduate of the University of Miami where she received double Bachelor of Arts degrees in Latin American & Caribbean Studies and International Development with a minor in Spanish, was selected from among the applicants who applied to represent St. Maarten at this youth forum.
Majoring in these subjects has allowed Melanie to be very knowledgeable of numerous cultures, languages, and institutions, especially those particular to the Latin American and Caribbean region.
During her last two years in Miami, she interned for Diaspora Vibe Cultural Arts Incubator, a local Miami 501(c)(3) organization that offers support and exhibition opportunities for Emerging Artists of the Latin American and Caribbean Diaspora.
In late March of this year, Melanie traveled to Kingston, Jamaica with Diaspora Vibe and fourteen American and UK-based artists to host its 15th International Cultural Exchange at the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts.
Melanie Choisy to Represent St. Maarten at the UNESCO Caribbean Youth Forum on Safeguarding Intangible Cultural Heritage

PHILIPSBURG, St. Maarten - The UNESCO Caribbean Youth Forum on Safeguarding Intangible Cultural Heritage will be held November 20-24 in Grenada.

The objectives of the forum are to:

build knowledge of youth on the Convention’s concepts and mechanisms and their role in safeguarding intangible cultural heritage;

foster dialogue among youth on strategies to strengthen the safeguarding of intangible cultural heritage;

orient youth toward activities and collaboration geared at safeguarding their intangible cultural heritage, and building mutual respect for the heritage of others.

The five-day forum which will be structured around a number of sessions will be attended by approximately 25 participants from youth groups/organizations from about 16 different Caribbean Small Island and Developing States (SIDS) and Least Developed Countries (LDCs).

At the conclusion of the session, participants will draft a brief report on their experience during the Forum, which will be submitted to the 7th session of the Intergovernmental Committee for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage.

Melanie Choisy who is a 22-year-old recent graduate of the University of Miami where she received double Bachelor of Arts degrees in Latin American & Caribbean Studies and International Development with a minor in Spanish, was selected from among the applicants who applied to represent St. Maarten at this youth forum.

Majoring in these subjects has allowed Melanie to be very knowledgeable of numerous cultures, languages, and institutions, especially those particular to the Latin American and Caribbean region.

During her last two years in Miami, she interned for Diaspora Vibe Cultural Arts Incubator, a local Miami 501(c)(3) organization that offers support and exhibition opportunities for Emerging Artists of the Latin American and Caribbean Diaspora.

In late March of this year, Melanie traveled to Kingston, Jamaica with Diaspora Vibe and fourteen American and UK-based artists to host its 15th International Cultural Exchange at the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts.

Happy Holiday’s from all of us here at Diaspora Vibe Virtual Gallery! 

Happy Holiday’s from all of us here at Diaspora Vibe Virtual Gallery!